Worx WG719 review: Is it efficient?

The Verdict

Lightweight and easy to manoeuvre, the Worx WG719 makes a decent job out of its mowing and mulching capabilities.The unique design of the wheels provides agility and mobility considerably better than most lawnmowers out there.

Pros

easy operation, durable and lightweight (only 56 pounds), exceptional mulching via its steel cutting deck, caster wheels for easy manoeuvring, easy stand-up storing, 7-level cutting height adjustments, 3-in-1 disposal options

Cons

some design flaw on the placement of the grass bag, inconsistent wheeling alignment, harder to move in boxy lawn corners

Worx WG719 review

Worx is a company that emphasizes innovation in its products, and it shows in their long line of reliable power tools and accessories. They take some classic pieces like mowers and hedge trimmers and reinvent them into user-friendly yet modern and intuitive tools. People know and talk about their merchandise because of their unique quality in the market. Worx’ passion for creation, customer satisfaction, and innovation make them one of the popular and trusted brands for home and yard care projects.

Worx WG719 reviews are fairly positive. In this article I will discuss and rate this product in terms of its performance and reliability in different aspects to look out for in a lawnmower.

 

Performance and Cut Quality

The WG719 model is one of Worx’ electric corded models, and therefore does not require gas or tune-ups, which is a definite plus for me. Its power is rated at 13 AMPS, and for someone who has a small yard, this product is more than enough to perform a decent mowing of my lawn. Performance-wise, this product has the basic advantages of an electric lawnmower, including less noise and no fumes production.

It has that range of motion that I haven’t seen in other mowers, and this could be credited to its front caster wheels. This results in an evenly cut lawn, and this is especially handy for lawns that are contoured or bumpy. However, extreme caution is needed for when mowing on hilly land, since the caster wheels can might “dance” if you forget to engage the lock (I’ve forgotten quite a few times).

While it may not promise a greater power than other heavy-duty lawnmowers, the WG719’s edge is its 20-inch steel deck diameter that cuts quite an expansive space in one go. My lawn is well-kept, so using this mower required only a single pass to get those stubborn weeds out.  To think that it only uses a single blade, I’m quite surprised how well it performs in cutting compared to other fancier, multiple-blade mowers have.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Ease of Use

While the design might not be considered compact, and the weight is considerably heavier than other Worx’ electric mowers, I will still give this mower a positive rating on its usability. It is an electric start, so it only requires pressing the push-button starter and it fires away instantly. I always highlight a mower’s ability to be pushed without hassle, and this model easily joins the ranks of such lawnmowers. It also feels comfortable holding the foam-padded handle while I’m mowing.

I also like how WG719 is quite the space-saving machine. Its collapsible handle makes it turn into this compact, stand-up mower that is so easy to stow away. Perhaps the cording is one thing that I normally wouldn’t prefer because of the tripping hazard it poses, but then there’s no concern about the machine stopping halfway because of a drained battery. I guess its usability makes up for this risk, as long as you always mind where and how the power cables are laid.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Special Features

One defining a feature of this Worx model is the caster wheel design that allows the machine to be agile and mobile; cutting sideways or at odd angles is possible and even easy to do. This is advantageous for bumpy or contoured terrain. The wheel turns on an axle and swerves on the surface, and can be locked to disable the feature. The 13-amp power rating of the electric motor is powerful enough to mow a small yard and uses a 12-gauge cord.

There are 7 levels for height adjustment, ranging from 11/4 to 4 inches, and can be adjusted according to grass condition and preference. It also has 3-in-21 disposal capabilities, such as bagging, mulching, and side discharge. Its handle is insulated by foam and can be collapsed for easy storage.

The model uses a Worx trademark NutriCut blade that guarantees excellent mulching of the grass clippings. It is dual-edge, ensuring that the grass is minced finely. The steel deck blade is 19 inches long and I like how it’s quick and easy to mulch my way through the yard with this single blade.

 

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Design

The most notable innovative design of the Worx WG719 is the caster wheel, and I’ve mentioned it quite a few times above. It is impressive for its ability to move on its axle and pivot the rear wheels easily. This makes for greater agility and traction for when you are moving on uneven terrain. However, the same design also causes some trouble for this model, because it tends to stray away from the path. If you want a mower that’s well-aligned and doesn’t have extra movements, this model is not for you. Yes, there is a locking feature for the caster wheel, so that makes up for it a bit. Also, you should buy a weed whacker if your lawn is box-type—the caster wheel sticks out about 6 inches away from the body, so it’s impossible to mow in corners.

There is also a bit of trouble when it comes to the placement of the bag. I’ve noticed that the chute isn’t securely hooked in place, causing some of the grass clippings to launch out of the bag. This poses danger especially when you are mowing because it might hurt you or bystanders around the vicinity. This is why I still prefer mulching than bagging. However, when it comes to filling up the bag, it does so completely. At a capacity of 1.4 Bushels, this design is impressive. The functionality, not so much.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

 

Cost Effectiveness

For a mower priced at around $200, you’d definitely conclude that this is a wise buy. Speaking about its features that may be so; however, it would be better to evaluate whether the limitations are worth using on your own yard. For example, the caster wheels make it impossible to mow in corners. If you have a boxy lawn, are you willing to compromise by manually removing the weeds and grass with a weed whacker? If not, then the cost cannot justify its value for you.

If we were to base solely on the cutting quality, I would say this is worth the money. The NutriCut blade is a single yet effective steel deck comparable to any fancy blade design of other mowers out there. I am very satisfied with how well it cuts the grass clippings, and it’s worthy to mention the mulching quality that surpasses my expectations for something priced like the WG719.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Grass Collection and Discharge

With the bag capacity (1.4 bushels), I can say that the grass collection in terms of quantity is impressive. It is capable of filling up the grass bag completely without stalling, and that’s a positive for when choosing a lawnmower. However, I’ve mentioned the problem with the bag displacement, and this is definitely a risk to watch out for when bagging. My advice is to check that the bag is securely hooked before proceeding with the operation to protect yourself and the people around you.

The mulching capability is more than what I ask for, and the mulch that it puts back to the lawn is of fine quality. I love mulching, and it figures that I     look out for this feature the most in any lawnmower. The Worx WG719 model performs satisfactorily when it comes to mulching, and we have the 19-in NutriCut blade steel deck to thank for that.

On the other hand, the side-discharge option is ordinary and functions well. The unit comes with a side-discharge chute made to clear the path quite efficiently.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Manoeuvrability

The caster wheel design is the main component that provides the machine’s agility and makes for excellent manoeuvrability when mowing. Sometimes, it is a little too overperforming when being pushed, particularly since the caster wheels make it move so much. I’ve had real trouble navigating this mower for a while. Think of a shopping cart with a misaligned wheel—it strays from the path quite a lot. You need to lock it when you want to go the straightway, which consequently limits its pivoting capability, in my opinion.

The steel deck, although very useful, can also contribute to the added weight and therefore feels heavier to push compared to the other Worx electric mowers. If you are used to a composite plastic deck, this would feel weird on the first few uses.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

 

Maintenance

The best thing about electric mowers is that there is no need for tune-ups, and this model definitely has this advantage. You do not need to worry about any gas leaks or fumes, too. What you do need to keep in mind is to check it before and after using. I make it a point to check whether screws are tightened and the parts are put in place. There is no definite maintenance schedule, but I make one for my own use so that I know when to clean the machine, water the batteries (or replace them if necessary), and sharpen the blade.

The blade needs proper care to ensure that it is sharp before using. You do not want a blade that cannot cut grass evenly, so it’s best if you check not only its sharpness but the balance as well. Also, I wipe the blade every time I use it on dense grass so as to cut properly. Grass clippings can form clumps on the blade, making the machine more effort than is necessary.

The unit comes with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee and a 3-year limited warranty for manufacturing defects, which covers the replacement of parts.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

Overall Rating

4 out of 5

 

What’s in the box?

The Worx WG719 package contains the single unit with minor assembly. You do not need to use a tool to do so. The handles come collapsed, but it’s effortless to put it up to make the lawnmower ready for operation.

The unit is complete with the necessary parts for operation. This includes a foam-cushioned and collapsible handle, operating bail, safety button, handle knob, front caster wheels with its control button and height adjustment lever, motor cover, rear wheel height adjustment lever, safety flap, blade bolt, and spacer.

The box also includes both a mulching plug and a side discharge chute and its cover. These are easy to attach, but for your safety, you can ask an expert to assemble it for you. Aside from these, a spanner wrench is also included, and as well as an instruction manual for your reference.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can it handle uneven terrain?

A: The WG719 operates by the manual push and not self-propelled, but it is well-designed to handle uneven terrain. This is due to the caster wheel that has an adaptive function that is capable of mowing through bumpy or contoured terrain.

Q: What is the max cut height?

A: The manufacturer guarantees a maximum cut height of 4 inches, but I actually adjusted it up to around 6 inches, which is because of its 7-level cutting height adjustment for both its front caster and rear wheel.

Q: Can it mulch?

Yes, the box comes with a mulching plug that can be attached to make the mower mulch through the lawn. It uses a 19-inch NutriCut blade that produces fine quality mulch which I absolutely adore.

Q: Can it mow on hilly terrain?

A: Yes, but remember to look the caster wheel before mowing uphill, or you’ll find the mower straying from the path you want to mow. Also, mow across the slope’s face and not up or down to prevent any accidental falls.

Q:  How much assembly is required upon receiving the mower?

A: Some minor assembly comes with it, which includes the bagging, mulching or side discharge option, for which appropriate tools are to be attached before you can go ahead with one of these disposal methods. The assembly takes no more than 5 minutes and does not need any tools